SHOWING POSTS TAGGED: Chef’s Garden Tips

posted on by Jackie Bebenroth

The Great Garlic Harvest

You might remember, back in November, when we lovingly placed our five favorite varieties of garlic cloves in the ground and covered them with straw.  The seasons were good to our little guys, who grew into almost 800 heads for our cooking pleasure. We’ve fielded a few questions about garlic growing in recent months, most commonly, “How do you know when it’s ready to pull out?” Well, timing’s important, but so is your technique. Step #1: Cover your head with the best protection money can buy. Step #2: Press your shovel in deep. Right below the bulbs. Step #3: Grab the stem, all the way down at the base. Twist and pull. Step #4: Repeat. Step #5: Once it comes out, let it rest. Maybe a few days or so. When the cloves get hard, you know it’s ready. Editor’s Note: Images shown above are a recreation of the actual harvesting … READ MORE

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posted on by Jackie Bebenroth

The War on Deer

The long and short of it is this: Suburban deer have been annailating our crops and totally outsmarting us for five years. They’ve overcome all levels of defense, no matter how extreme, creative or intensive. We’ve tried virtually everything to keep these pesky, voracious creatures away from our food. 1. Wire fence. 2. Electric fence. 3. Slingshot. 4. Multi-layered electric fence. 5. Let the dogs out. (woof. woof.) 6. Piss around the perimeter. 7. Top-line fencing. 8. Deer skull on a stick. 9. Ribbons hanging from top line fencing. 10. Multi-layered, wire, wood, electric, three-dimensional fencing. 11. Mean eyes on ribbons, blowing in the wind. 12. Japenese drums. 13. Paintball gun. None of this has made a dent in the deer’s ability to chomp down our harvest. In fact, deer have eaten so many of our vegetables, vegetarians might qualify them as edible if we put them on our menu. After … READ MORE

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posted on by Noelle P.

Q + A with Spice Farm Manager, Andrea Heim

Andrea Heim recently returned from Jamaica after spending the last two years working in the Peace Corps educating the island farmers about organic agriculture. Her new gig as Spice Farm Manager marks her return to farming in the States. Andrea’s planting extends far beyond the Spice Acres Suburbia, the 10,000 sq. ft. plot behind Chef Ben Bebenroth’s home. She’s looking after the 100+ containers on the restaurant roof. She’s building raised beds behind the parking lot. She’s watering lettuces in the hoop houses. Look for her buzzing around the edible landscaping on the patio next time you’re in. All this farming fanatic really needs is some seeds, a little dirt, water and sunlight and she could feed a village…or at least few thousand guests at Spice Kitchen + Bar and Spice of Life Catering Co. this summer. Let’s see what she’s up to. Q. You have quite an interesting background … READ MORE

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